Multiple-I’s

Autobiographical

In ordinary everyday talk I forget about it, of course, but when there’s an ‘I’ that’s directing my conscious attention it no longer thinks of itself as I-singular. The conventional ‘I’ of ordinary everyday talk—distortion of potential Being—is an abstraction from the multitude of possible ‘I’s that it has at its disposal.

A something-or-other that, as a two or three year old, did not at all think of itself as ‘I’, was born in 1937, the year the Hindenburg dissolved into flames, the year of Michael Tippett’s First Piano Sonata, amongst other things, no doubt.

Then, for a long time, joining the generally friendly fraternity of human beings in my circle, I learned to refer to my self as ‘I’—Big-I-am. But things changed: it began to make much more sense when, as a result of reading the Commentaries of Maurice Nicoll, there occurred an ‘I’ that chose to think of itself as multiple—a concoction of many variously contextualised ‘I’s.

Not at all into self advertisement, Working-I survived the whole of its ‘career’ years without ever having been dragged into the modern fad for writing a CV. However Resigned-I is prepared to admit that the following have been important parts of its ‘professional’ life, not necessarily in this order:-

Cat-lover-I
‘I’ that can still tackle Ancient Greek & Latin if required
Teacher/facilitator-I
Educationist-I
Master Practitioner-of-NLP-I
NLP-trainer-I
Grubber-in-Secondhand-Bookshops-I
Purchaser-at-random-of-obscure-modern-classical-music-I
Enabler-I
Writer-I (novels, poetry, philosophical farragoes)
Haiku-writer-I
Self-taught-composer-I
Being-shy-I
Ingenious-I
Thrower-of-things-up-in-the-air-to-see-where-they-land-I
Chain-reader-I
Grumpy-old-man-I
Small-press-operator-I
Summerhouse-builder-I
Watercolourist-I
Collage-making-I
Enneagram-fanatic-I
4th Way-enthusiast-I

And many more ‘I’s—millions of them…

To learn how to analyse yourself in this way and discover the huge practical benefits of doing so, both for yourself and for others, have at look at Enneagram Studies

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